Trump, Pence at top of 2024 Republican presidential primary

President Donald Trump speaks during an "Operation Warp Speed Vaccine Summit" on the White House complex, Tuesday, Dec. 8, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

If President Donald Trump’s legal efforts are unsuccessful in securing a second term beginning in 2021, he would be at the top of the list of primary voters in 2024, according to a post-election survey of Republican voters.

This image from Echelon Insights features the results of 2024 Republican primary candidates.

Echelon Insights, a data, polling and research firm based in Washington, D.C., released the data taken from a mid-November survey of 1,001 verified voters.

The survey asked voters which candidates they would “consider” supporting in the Republican primary. Voters could choose multiple options.

Trump leads with 52% of voters but is followed closely by Pence, with 45%.

In third place is 2016’s runner-up, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, with 32%.

Rounding out the top five are Donald Trump Jr. with 22% and former South Carolina governor and U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, with 20%.

The survey also asked what concerned them the most about the Republican Party if Joe Biden became president.

Forty-four percent of voters said they were most concerned that new leaders wouldn’t fight like Donald Trump, by far the leading response. Abandoning Trump’s policies received 19%, and for 13%, their top concern was the party continuing to be run by Trump supporters.

In addition to the Echelon Insights poll, a poll conducted by the UNLV Lee Business School poll, in conjunction with British international gaming company BUSR, showed that Trump would overwhelmingly lead a 2024 N.C. presidential primary.

The UNLV poll also tested several names for the 2022 Republican primary, and Lara Trump held a one-point lead over former Gov. Pat McCrory. Mark Walker, who was the first Republican to formally announce a bid last week, took 7%.

An N.C. State professor of political science and international affairs, however, cast doubt on the UNLV poll’s value, saying on Twitter, “This means…. absolutely nothing at all.”